What’s the name for the ‘weird’ period between Christmas and New Year?


The time between Christmas and New Year can be very confusing, and the Norwegians even have a name for it. But what do we call that ‘weird’ period in the UK? Here is everything you need to know

Christmas tree and woman with wine
Christmas is over and many feel a bit ‘in limbo’

Christmas is technically over. You’ve stuffed yourself on turkey, roast potatoes and Brussels sprouts, and you have unwrapped every present under the tree.

The day after, on Boxing Day, you might have continued eating your Christmas leftovers with family, or just had a nice relaxing day.

After that the main day of the festive period is New Year’s Eve.

Somewhere between December 27 and December 31, time becomes quite abstract, and it can be hard to know what to do with yourself.

You’ve spent the whole of December preparing for Christmas Day – buying presents, planning meals and drinking lots of mulled wine.

But come December 27 you’re left to navigate post-Christmas life with a tin of Quality Streets which only includes the chocolates no one wants.

What is the period between Christmas and New Year called?

The presents have been opened – what to do now?
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Image:

Education Images/Universal Images Group/Getty Images)

There isn’t a specific name for the week between Christmas and New Year in English.

In Norway they call it Romjul or mellomjul, which basically means the period between Christmas and New Year.

However, some people have decided to make up their own word for it.

One user on Twitter said: “Between Christmas and New Year – Twixtmas.”

Another person took to the platform and said: “The time between Christmas and New Year’s Day is called the Witching Week and nothing you do in this week counts.”

Another word which sums up what many people do during this time is “Food Week,” which was suggested by a Twitter user.

Chrimbo Limbo is another suggestion, because “no one knows what day it is”.

There also seems to be some agreement that it should be called the “Festive Perineum”.

Other suggestions on social media include “Christmastide”, “the void”, the “festive period” or the “Taint”.

What to do between Christmas and New Year

You could do some shopping in the sales
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Getty Images)

What you do between Christmas and New Year is entirely up to you.

For some it may just be a normal week at work, others may want to relax, or to get stuff done around the house.

If you’re feeling a bit lost, you could always have a clear out. You might have got some extra belongings over Christmas, so it’s a great time to sort through everything.

Throw away any clothes you haven’t worn over the last year, and be ruthless with old things.

If you want to get some exercise done, you could go for a nice wintry walk. Get some fresh air and discover a new place.

This time is also a great time to pick up the book that’s been on the shelf for six months, or testing out the new Kindle you got for Christmas.

After Christmas there is also likely to be a lot of sales, so you could do a spot of shopping.

What do you call the time between Christmas and New Year? Let us know in the comments below.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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