UK weather: ‘Thundersnow’ hits Britain with snow and ice warnings issued for Friday


Parts of Britain were left under a blanket of snow today as a ‘cold air mass’ spread over the country. A yellow warning for snow and ice is in force from midnight to 10am on Friday in Suffolk and Kent

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UK Weather: Parts of UK see heavy snow and hail

Anyone thinking spring was here to stay got a shock today as a cold snap left parts of Britain under a blanket of snow.

After putting away our warm clothing, winter returned to remind us of all how unpredictable the British weather is.

“Thundersnow” swept across the country, dumping up to 2.4in in Northumberland, Cumbria, Scotland and Yorkshire. It was certainly a change from last week’s mild weather, known as a fool’s spring, which brought sunshine and highs of 20C.

The Met Office issued a yellow warning for snow and ice from midnight to 10am tomorrow along the coast of Suffolk and a large part of Kent.







Motorists clear snow from their vehicles on a residential street in Durham
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Image:

North News & Pictures Ltd (northnews.co.uk)

Another was in place for the North East, parts of the East Midlands and eastern Scotland. It means there is a “risk of disruption” from the conditions forecast.

Roads and railways in the South are “likely to be affected, with longer travel times by road, bus and train services”.

The Met Office also warned of the potential for “some injuries from slips and falls on icy surfaces”, and “probably some icy patches on untreated roads, pavements and cycle paths”.







Scotland was also covered in snow today
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Image:

Euan Cherry)







A couple walk their dog through snow on part of the Pennine Way on Saddleworth Moor near Oldham
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Image:

Matt Wilkinson/Stella Pictures Ltd)

Met Office meteorologist Matty Box said there was now a “cold air mass” spread over the UK.

He added: “Showers will become less frequent, but still with the chance of some on the east coast and the North Sea coast.

“There should be a fair amount of sunshine as well with sunny spells.”

A thundersnow is a storm that brings snow instead of rain.







A woman walks on a snow-covered street in Sheffield
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Image:

Ioannis Alexopoulos/LNP)

Bingley, West Yorks, had falls of 2.4in while parts of the North-East were under 12in of the white stuff.

Temperatures are predicted to plummet further over the weekend, so keep those woollies close to hand.

But the weather is expected to be fine again for the Easter holidays.







Motorists have been facing tricky driving conditions due to the snow
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Image:

Andrew McCaren/LNP)

The Met Office’s long range weather forecast from April 5 to April 14 says: “Through Tuesday, any rain across northern parts will mostly clear through the day, though leaving some rain and drizzle on upslopes.”

Other parts of the country are expected to remain dry, cloudy and breezy, according to forecasters.

Later in the week, further unsettled conditions are expected, with most areas seeing spells or rain or showers.







County Durham has been blanketed today
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Image:

Newcastle Chronicle)

The Met Office adds: “Periods of drier and more settled weather are still possible, but more short-lived than recently.

“Showers may be heavy at times, with hail and thunder possible. Strong winds are also likely at times, mainly in the north and the west, with temperatures generally near or slightly above average.”

The forecast from April 15 to April 29 adds the weather will remain unsettled, with rain and showers expected.







Snow covered Yorkshire too
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Image:

Andrew McCaren/LNP)

It reads: “Showers may be heavy at times, some perhaps thundery with a chance of hail.

“Strong winds are also likely, particularly to the north and west.”

At the end of April, Brits may enjoy more settled conditions, with temperatures above average, especially in the south.

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www.mirror.co.uk

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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