Top toys of Christmas past and just how much they would’ve set you back


Whilst the list to Father Christmas might change each year, there are certain toys that stick out as the pinnacle presents of their decade including Barbies and Beanie Babies

Furbies were all the rage in the 1990s
Furbies were all the rage in the 1990s

Is there anything more reminiscent of a childhood Christmas than thumbing through the Argos catalogue circling the toys that you’d like from Father Christmas?

The season of present giving is well and truly upon us and Parkdean Resorts have conducted a new study that is bringing all of the Christmas nostalgia.

The study looks at what the most popular toys of each era were, and how much they would’ve set you back; and let’s just say, the rise in those pounds and pennies over the decades are a little disheartening.

Hamleys, Regent Street in December 1946
(

Image:

Mirrorpix)

1920s to 1940s

1920s: Let’s start with the roaring 1920s. If you grew up in this decade it’s likely that you’d have asked Santa to bring you a chemistry set for Christmas.

At a cost of just £3.62 at the time, these sets included everything an aspiring scientist would have needed to experiment with to make a variety of lotions and potions.

1930s: The 1930s brought a lot of bang for your buck with the arrival of the Buck Rogers Pocket Pistol. Only costing 37p at the time, these realistic looking guns even let off a bang when the trigger was squeezed and quickly became a popular toy for kids.

1940s: Still standing as a firm family favourite today, unbelievably, LEGO first hit the shelves in the 40s. Now LEGO sets offer everything from Disney castles to sports cars, but you can expect to spend a small fortune on the huge range of LEGO kits today, compared to around £4.10, 80 years ago.

John Johnson (left) aged five, and Elizabeth Milland in Cambridge, 1954
(

Image:

Mirrorpix)

1950s to 1970s

1950s: The arrival of one of the most popular dolls worldwide came in the 50s. We are of course talking about Barbie, the classic blond-haired doll that cost only £2.18, 60 years ago.

Barbie became a hit in the 50s and remains a top toy throughout the decades
(

Image:

Julio Etchart via Getty)

1960s: For those who preferred to let their imagination run wild, Hot Wheels were a popular choice. Custom-built tracks were available to create the ultimate driving terrain for any bedroom floor. Originally designed to look like American hot rods, a new toy car cost a mere 43p in the 60s.

1970s: In the 70s, Stretch Armstrong was here to save the day. An original doll would have cost £7.98 at the time, whilst no expense was spared in his flexibility, stretching himself to a whopping five foot long.

Electronic toys were also popular in the 80s, specifically the Merlin Electronic games machine in 1980
(

Image:

Mirrorpix)

1980s to 2000s

1980s: The 80s saw the arrival of a tiny, tiny soon-to-be household favourite: Polly Pocket. Less than an inch tall, these dolls came in miniature doll houses, shaped like carry cases for easy transportation – meaning your Polly Pocket could go wherever you went. In the 1980s, Polly would set you back around £14.51.

Beanie Babies were a 90s must-have present
(

Image:

Lea Suzuki via Getty)

1990s: Arguably the collectable toy of the 90s was brought to you by manufacturers Ty in the form of Beanie Babies and were the first ever internet sensation due to their extreme popularity. The first Beanie Babies cost just £3.63.

2000s: A new century meant a new fashion doll to rival Barbie made it onto the scene; Bratz. Bratz were presented as a fashion-forward, on trend doll. Exaggerated features and bold outfits were their trademark and made these dolls fierce competitors of Barbie in an attempt to appeal to a younger audience.

Read More

Read More




www.mirror.co.uk

See also  Covid-19: The economy that needs a planetary health | Expert network | Future Planet

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.