Storm Barra Map shows time and location of severe wind and snow across UK


As the second storm worthy of an amber warning in two weeks crashes into the UK amid fears of a danger to life, we look at maps showing how it is moving across the country and how storm Barra got its name

Sherkin Island, off the south coast of Ireland, has recorded a gust of wind 113kmh today
Sherkin Island, off the south coast of Ireland, has recorded a gust of wind 113kmh today

The UK and Ireland are taking a battering from storm Barra today, as the second major weather event in as many weeks rips across the countries bringing heavy rain and strong winds.

The storm is being caused by a deep area of low pressure moving in from the Atlantic.

Because it is coming in from the west, it is not expected to be as severe or disruptive as the recent storm Arwen, which came in from the north.

The strong winds and rain could turn into snow when they reach northern England and Scotland.

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution has pleased with people in coastal areas to stay “well back from the water’s edge”, as large waves and strong winds have been reported in many areas.

Here’s what you need to know about the timings for when locations across the UK will fee for Storm Barra’s impact.

Storm Barra weather warnings

Below, you will find a run down of the day and how the weather will be affected by Storm Barra at certain times.

Map shows areas of low pressure at 2pm Tuesday December 7 2021
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Image:

Met Office)

Yellow weather warnings are in place across much of the country today, with parts of the UK expecting winds in the region of 70mph to batter into exposed coastal areas.

Map shows areas of low pressure at Tuesday 7 December 2021 at 7pm
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Image:

Met Office)

Coastal parts of the south west could see winds gusting at 80mph, with a ‘danger to life’ warning having been issued by the Met Office.

Inland, winds gusting at around 65mph are expected with average winds speeds expected to reach 40mph at times.

Map shows areas of low pressure at Tuesday 7 December 2021 at 12pm
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Image:

Met Office)

A red warning remains in place for parts of southern Ireland leading to the closure of schools and leaving many without power.

The storm began in December and was named on Sunday, December 5, 2021.

Storm Barra name meaning

Southsea amidst storm Barra
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Image:

PA)

The storm is called Barra because it is the second storm of the season, following Arwen in November.

As the first storm of the season Arwen got a name beginning with ‘A’, and as the second, Barra, gets ‘B’. The third storm of the season if there is one will be called Corrie.

The storm was given its name by Met √Čireann, due to the higher level of impact expected in the Republic of Ireland.

International cooperation on the name comes as part of the Met Office’s Name Our Storms program. It first launched in 2015 in collaboration with Irish and Dutch forecasters and sees a new list of names come out each September.

The aim of storm naming with a universal name is to aid communication between forecasters, the media and governments.

Storms get named when they have the potential to cause an amber or red warning.

The letters Q, U, X, Y and Z don’t get used when naming storms to be consistent with the US National Hurricane Center, who do not use these letters. This is to ensure consistency for all official storm naming in the Atlantic.

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www.mirror.co.uk

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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