Sad fear stopped Kate Middleton and William calling Princess Charlotte Diana or Elizabeth


Royal experts believe Kate Middleton and Prince William’s decision not to name Princess Charlotte after her gran or great-gran, and instead honor the pair with her middle names was “wise”

Kate Middleton, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, posted pictures on Instagram for Mothers' Day
Kate and Charlotte

When the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge told the world they had welcomed a baby girl, many royal fans hoped they would name the new princess after Diana or the Queen.

But instead, they opted for Charlotte Elizabeth Diana – or Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge if you’re feeling official.

While there were nods to her great-grandmother and late grandmother thanks to the middle names, some were disappointed.

Royal expert Richard Kay has since shared his belief that this decision was “wise”, claiming Kate and William didn’t want to give their daughter a name that they would see her constantly compared to royal women before her.

Speaking on the Channel 5 documentary ‘Secrets of the Royal Palaces’, he said: “I think he very wisely decided not to give Charlotte his mother’s name as her first name.

Experts says it’s “wise” they didn’t name Charlotte after Diana
(

Image:

GettyImages)

Love the royals? Sign up for the Mirror’s daily newsletter to get all the latest news on the Queen, Charles, Kate, Wills, Meghan, Harry and the rest of The Firm. Click here to sign up .

“Everything she did and said would have been compared with her.

“By giving Diana as the middle name, it means Diana is still there.”

Emily Andrews, royal editor of the Mail on Sunday, added: “William has spoken about the loss of his mother and the impact it had.

“He thinks about her pretty much every day and he wants to keep his mother’s memory alive.”

Meghan and Harry named their daughter after both the Queen and Diana
(

Image:

GettyImages)

However Meghan Markle and Prince Harry didn’t seem as worried about this when it came to picking a name for their daughter.

While they didn’t pick Elizabeth, they went for the Queen’s family nickname – Lilibet.

This raised some eyebrows, especially when some sources claimed the couple hadn’t asked the Queen’s permission.

But a spokesman for the Sussexes, who lived in the Los Angeles suburb of Montecito after quitting their roles as senior royals, said they wouldn’t have used the name “had she not been supportive.”

They said: “The duke spoke with his family in advance of the announcement, in fact his grandmother was the first family member he called.

“During that conversation, he shared their hope of naming their daughter Lilibet in her honour. Had she not been supportive, they would not have used the name.”

The 95-year-old monarch was said to have been “delighted” and thought the tribute to both her and Harry’s late mother was a “lovely idea”.

Princess Charlotte, who was born in 2015, was christened at a small church in Sandringham in honor of Diana.

Unlike her brothers Prince George and Prince Louis, who were christened at St James Palace, Charlotte’s christening was held in St Mary Magdalene’s Church on the Queen’s Sandringham estate.

Ms Andrews explained: “It has the history through William’s mother, Diana Spencer, as she was also christened there.”

Mr Kay added: “Prince William likes this symbolism. He has made it clear that he wanted Diana to be involved on the journey that he embarked on with Kate.

“First as his wife by presenting her with his mother’s engagement ring, and then at Charlotte’s christening because he chose the very church where Diana was christened herself.”

Have you got a story to share? We want to hear all about it. Email us at [email protected]

Read More

Read More




www.mirror.co.uk

See also  Kinder warning ahead of Easter as 70 catch salmonella - full list of products affected

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.