Russian invasion of Ukraine MAPPED: Putin’s troops in brutal battle for nuclear plant – World News


Russia has taken control of its first major city in Ukraine, with enemy forces taking control of Kherson, while other key targets for Putin, including Kyiv, continue to hold firm

A man walks through the remains of a damaged building in Kharkiv

In the first week of the Russian invasion of Ukraine enemy troops have failed to take control of several key sites, but have taken their first city amid severe shelling leaving dozens dead and more injured.

Russian forces today seized Zaporizhzhia, Europe’s largest power station, in heavy fighting as fierce battles continue to be raged for control of several key cities around Ukraine.

Capital Kyiv, one of tyrant Vladimir Putin’s major targets, came under renewed attack today with explosions heard in the city centre, which is now practically deserted as people flee advancing forces.

A massive convoy of vehicles stretching for around 40 miles continues to be stalled on the road leading to the city, amid concerns it is regrouping for a major attack.

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The Russian advance on capital Kyiv
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Press Association Images)

Experts say around 15,000 troops are part of the armored group which are believed to be waiting for supplies before launching an offensive on Kyiv.

Control for some areas have already been wrested out of Ukraine’s hands.

Kherson, seen as a key city because of its port, became the first to fall into Russian control yesterday with its mayor, Igor Kolykhaev, saying enemy troops forced their way into the council building.







A young man throws a cocktail Molotovs during a self-defence civilian course on the outskirts of Lviv
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AFP via Getty Images)

Residents still in the area now live under a strict curfew.

Several others have come under intense shelling since Putin ordered the invasion of their peaceful neighbor last week.

  • Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second largest city, has suffered intense attacks for several days with several dead but continues to hold out, despite rumors of Russian paratroopers landing nearby.
  • Chernihiv has come under heavy fire with at least 47 people killed in intense shelling by Russia, with aerial attacks hitting apartment buildings and a hospital






The invasion as it stands so far
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  • Sumy, in the east of the country, is surrounded by Russians but is yet to fall.
  • Mariupol, another port city, has also come under sustained attack. Its major has warned of a “humanitarian catastrophe” but did not explain more.
  • Mykolayiv, in the south, continues to be under Ukrainian control, despite enemy troops entering the city.
  • Lviv, close to the Police border in the west, has not yet come under shelling from the Russians.
  • Dnipro has experienced heavy shelling as it is seen as a key link to the east and west of Ukraine
  • Russian forces have been seen massing off the coast of port city Odessa in the south

Meanwhile, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said he believes Russia is using cluster bombs in Ukraine, in violation of international law.

Despite that NATO allies have rejected Ukraine’s demand for no-fly zones, saying such a direct intervention would lead to an even more brutal war.

The capture of Europe’s biggest nuclear power on Friday amid heavy fighting in south-eastern Ukraine, triggered a global alarm, as a huge fire threatened to get out of control.







The attack on the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant
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The blaze was eventually extinguished but the plant, which gives power to around a quarter of Ukraine, is now in the hands of Russian invaders.

International Atomic Energy Agency chief Raphael Grossi described the situation as “normal operations, but in fact there is nothing normal about this”.

I have paid homage to the plant’s Ukrainian staff “to their bravery, to their courage, to their resilience because they are doing this in very difficult circumstances”.







Surveillance camera footage shows Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant during shelling
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Zaporizhzhya NPP via REUTERS)

Grossi said the plant was undamaged from what he believed was a Russian projectile. Only one reactor was working, at around 60 per cent of capacity.

The Kremlin has claimed the attack was made by Ukrainian rebels and that it fell into Russian hands in the first days of the war.

The attack came after Russian forces took Chernobyl on February 24.

Thousands of people are believed to have been killed or wounded and more than 1 million refugees have fled Ukraine since Feb. 24, when Putin ordered the biggest attack on a European state since the Second World War.







More than one million people have fled Ukraine for the safety of neighboring countries
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Press Association Images)

In Russia itself, where Putin’s main opponents have largely been jailed or driven into exile, the war has led to a further crackdown on dissent. Authorities have banned reports that refer

to the “special military operation” as a “war” or “invasion”.

Anti-war demonstrations have been squelched with thousands of arrests.

On Friday, Russia shut down foreign broadcasters including the BBC, Voice of America and Deutsche Welle.

The most prominent independent Russian broadcasters, TV Dozhd (Rain) and Ekho Moskvy radio, were shuttered on Thursday.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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