People on low income or certain benefits may qualify for cash support from their local council


If you are on a low income or certain benefits including Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA), Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) or Pension Credit and struggling financially due to an unexpected change in your circumstances, you may be eligible for cash support from your local council .

A Crisis Grant is a one-off payment that can provide much-needed support during an emergency, but it cannot be given to support your income long-term.

If you need help because you are on a low income, the quickest way to find out what financial support you may be able to claim is to use a benefits calculator. These are independent, free and confidential and only take a few minutes to complete online – you can find out more about ones from Turn2Us, Advice Direct Scotland, entitled to and Policy in Practice at the end of this article.

What is a Crisis Grant?

A Crisis Grant can be given to cover the costs of an emergency

Examples of this could include when:

  • there’s a fire or flood at home
  • you’ve lost money
  • an unexpected crisis happens
  • you’re a victim of domestic abuse and you need help with things like moving away from an abuser
  • you’re a grandparent or other relative who has taken over caring for a child, and you’re waiting on a transfer of benefits
  • you’re facing a gap in your normal income because of a redundancy or change at work

Who is eligible for a Crisis Grant?

To get a Crisis Grant you need to be on a low income, however, this doesn’t mean you need to be currently claiming benefits.

What counts as a low income

Guidance on Mygov.scot states: “There is no figure that will be used to judge whether you have a low income.”

As a guide, if you’re on one of the benefits below, or your income is about the same as someone who is, it’s more likely you’ll be able to get a Crisis Grant:

  • Income Support
  • Pension Credit
  • Income Based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA)
  • Income Based Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)
  • Universal Credit

What financial help is available?

If you do get a Crisis Grant, your local council will look at helping you with your most urgent living costs.

Some things this may include are help with the costs of:

Many local councils have welfare rights advisers who can:

  • tell you what benefits and other entitlements are available
  • carry out checks so you don’t miss out on any benefits
  • help you complete forms
  • give advice and support if your application for a benefit is turned down or you do not get the amount you were expecting


Contact your local council directly to find out if you are eligible for cash support

how to apply

You can apply directly to your local council through the Mygov.scot website here.

Online benefits calculators

You can use an independent benefits calculator to find out:

These calculators are free to use, anonymous, and could indicate benefits you’re missing out on.

Where to find help

Advice Direct Scotland

This new online tool is the first to fully integrate returned benefits, including the new Scottish Child Payment.

It provides a free and impartial assessment of entitlement to a range of benefits such as Universal Credit, crisis grants and support payments.

turn2us

Information on income-related benefits, Tax Credits, Council Tax Reduction, Carer’s Allowance, Universal Credit and how your benefits will be affected if you start work or change your working hours

Policy in Practice

Information on income-related benefits, Tax Credits, contribution-based benefits, Council Tax Reduction, Carer’s Allowance, Universal Credit, how these are calculated and how your benefits will be affected if you start work or change your working hours

entitledto

Information on income-related benefits, Tax Credits, contribution-based benefits, Council Tax Reduction, Carer’s Allowance, Universal Credit and how your benefits will be affected if you start work

Financial help in Scotland

What you will need

You will need accurate information about your:

  • Savings

  • Income, including your partner’s

  • Existing benefits and pensions (including anyone living with you)

  • Outgoings (such as rent, mortgage, childcare payments)

  • council tax bill

To keep up to date with the cost of living crisis, join our Money Saving Scotland Facebook group here, follow Record Money on Twitter hereor subscribe to our twice weekly newsletter here.




www.dailyrecord.co.uk

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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