Omicron variant HOPE amid UK Covid ‘tidal wave’ as South Africa sees fewer deaths


South African health leaders report fewer Covid patients needing ICU and fewer deaths, offering hope to the UK where the total number of daily Covid cases sky-rocketed to 93,045 – up 60% on last week

The UK's total number of daily Covid cases sky-rocketed to 93,045
The UK’s total number of daily Covid cases sky-rocketed to 93,045

The Omicron Covid variant wave is seeing fewer hospitalisations and deaths in South Africa, offering hope amid the UK’s tidal wave of cases.

Michelle Groome, the head of Public Health Surveillance at South Africa’s National Institute for Communicable Diseases, said: “The hospitalisations are not increasing at such a dramatic rate.

“We are starting to see some increases, but relatively small increases in deaths.”

It comes as the UK’s total number of daily Covid cases sky-rocketed to 93,045 – up 60% on last week – with London proving to be the hotspot for the Covid variant.

Around a quarter of cases recorded in the past 24 hours were in London, with the infection rate having risen fivefold since Omicron was first identified.

Members of the public queue to receive a dose of a Covid-19 vaccine at a coronavirus vaccination centre outside Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in central London

The new strain is expected to quickly become the dominant coronavirus strain in Britain, with just 3,201 new cases of Omicron officially registered yesterday – but that figure is thought to be vastly underestimated due to the time it takes to analyse positive samples.

The total number of Omicron cases confirmed in the UK currently stands at 14,909, but experts believe up to 400,000 people could be catching it every day.

Professor Neil Ferguson and his team at Imperial College London predict there could be around 3,000 daily Omicron deaths a day in January without further restrictions.

The alarming figures, much higher than the previous record of around 1,800 deaths in one day during the second wave of the pandemic, have prompted calls for more curbs in the New Year.

The new strain is expected to quickly become the dominant coronavirus strain in Britain, with just 3,201 new cases of Omicron officially registered yesterday
(

Image:

ANDY RAIN/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

The research also found no evidence that the variant was less severe than Delta – which has been the dominant strain in the UK up until now – and estimated it is five-and-a-half times more likely to re-infect people, concluding that Omicron “poses a major, imminent threat to public health”.

However, South Africa’s Professor Salim Abdool Karim told The Telegraph : “If you look at our current situation, we are showing lower severity across the full cascade.

“We are seeing fewer patients who are now symptomatic. We are seeing more asymptomatic cases.

“Of those who have symptoms, fewer of them require hospitalisations.

“Of those who’ve been hospitalised, fewer of them need oxygenation.

“Fewer of them need ICU care and fewer of them are dying.”

Chief Medical Officer for England Chris Whitty speaking at a press conference in London’s Downing Street
(

Image:

PA)

The UK’s eight worst Covid hotspots are now in London as Omicron rips through the capital.

Concerning data released today reveals an explosion of cases in London, where the variant has become the dominant strain.

Lambeth has the highest rate in the UK after the number of people testing positive grew by 131% in seven days.

It is closely followed by Wandsworth and Southwark, which saw an increase of 105% and 128% respectively.

Thurrock, in Essex, has the highest rate outside of London, the data reveals.

Of the 377 local areas in the UK, 241 (64%) have seen a week-on-week rise in rates, 134 (36%) have seen a fall and two are unchanged.

Read More

Read More




www.mirror.co.uk

See also  What is Ash Wednesday? Meaning behind the first day of Lent, fasting explained and when it falls in 2022

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.