Nathaniel Rateliff and the great musical mutation of the century | Sound Sofa


In 2013, after publishing several albums, Nathaniel Rateliff he was tired and thinking of quitting music and going back to working as a gardener. After more than a decade in Denver, where he had had some hits, the boy felt that his music was not having the impact he wanted.

After several intimate folk records that matched his long beard and deep voice, Rateliff was ready to throw in the towel. But first he decided to give himself one last chance with a soul band he just started, The Night Sweats. That could not be more accurate.

With his new band, Rateliff was going to turn his career around. “I wanted to make music that sounded like The Band and Sam and Dave together ”, the singer points out to Sofá Sonoro. The result was a collection like S.O.B o I Never Get Old, songs that saw the light in 2015 and that made him the great musical sensation of that year.

Along with his new project, Rateliff toured half the world, played at major festivals, sounded on the radio, on television series. He triumphed in a big way with his last bullet. Since then he has recorded two more albums alongside The Night Sweats, the last one –The Future– released this fall, and has re-released a solo album with much more impact.

Rateliff’s journey is passionate, his story is full of details, twists, but above all great songs, themes that we hear on this special program in which the author is the guest himself.


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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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