Monkeypox triples in Europe: WHO calls for action





The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for action “urgent” in Europe Given the sharp increase in cases of monkey pox. The director of the European region, Hans Kluge, has warned that the cases have tripled in the last two weeks until exceeding 4,500 laboratory-confirmed infections, which places the continent as the epicenter of the outbreak still “expanding”.

The risk of monkeypox is currently “high” in Europe, according to the United Nations agency, which, however, recently ruled out declaring an “international public health emergency”. This decision could be reviewed “soon”, according to Kluge in a statement this Friday.

“There is simply no room for complacency, especially here in the European region, with a rapidly evolving outbreak and that every hour, every day and every week extends its reach to areas that were previously unaffected,” he stressed.

In his letter, the regional director of the WHO insists on the speed of expansion, but also on concentration: Europe accounts for nearly 90% of all confirmed cases by laboratory and reported globally since mid-May.

Spain reaches 1,200 cases

And among the thousands of cases of monkeypox detected in Europe, up to 1,200 correspond to Spain. The WHO reports are always later, due to the difficulty of collecting the data, but the most up-to-date Spanish figure was offered this Friday by the minister Carolina Darias to the media, after visiting the Marqués de Valdecilla Hospital, in Santander.

By communities, Madrid has confirmed about 850 infections to date and Catalonia adds 380while Andalusia exceeds 100 and the Canary Islands exceeds 50. Other regions maintain lower figures, such as the Valencian Community (23), Aragón (14), Galicia (9) or Castilla y León (4).

Vulnerable groups are concerned: children, immunosuppressed and pregnant women

Given this situation, the director general of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, is concerned that “sustained transmission” of monkeypox over time will impact children, immunosuppressed people and pregnant women, groups especially vulnerable to the disease. Although isolated, the first cases have already begun to be detected.

“A number of cases have been reported so far, but in countries with good surveillance. We are aware of two cases in the United Kingdom and we are following up with Spain and France“, specified Abdi Mahamud, from the health emergency coordination department, in a joint press conference with the director general. “When we talk about ‘children’, they are under 18 years old, some of them can be 17, 18 years old. At the moment, we do not have any serious cases, but it is an age group that really worries us.”

For now, there is no room for alarm. Most of the cases reported so far in Europe are in people between 21 and 40 years of age and 99% are men, as Hans Kluge has specified in his statement. Barely 10% of patients have been admitted to a hospital for treatment or isolation, and only one has been admitted to the ICU.

In Europe, no person has died by this outbreak of monkeypox, which almost always presents with a skin rash and, frequently, with symptoms such as fever, fatigue, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, chills, sore throat or headache.

“Stigma fuels epidemics”

Most of the reported cases of monkeypox in Europe correspond to men who have sex with men. In smaller numbers, cohabitants have also been identified, “heterosexual and non-sexual contacts, as well as between children,” continues Kluge’s statement, who fears that the “stigmatization” of the most affected group.

“Many may simply choose not to report to health authorities, fearful of the potential consequences. We know from the lessons we have learned in the fight against HIV that stigma further fuels outbreaks and epidemics”has warned.

However, the regional director of the WHO considers that not acting out of fear of stigma “can be just as damaging.” In fact, he has reported that his office is working with governments, the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control and civil entities, including the organizers of the “Pride and other massive summer festivals and events.”

Unlearned lessons from the pandemic: Africa runs out of supplies

Thus, Kluge has urged countries to “redouble” its efforts to reverse the expansive trend of monkeypox in Europeand launches three guidelines: expand surveillance (with diagnosis, tracking and sequencing), improve the communication of preventive measures and maintain investments in public health.

“Monkeypox has once again illustrated how endemic or emerging diseases in a few countries can rapidly expand into outbreaks that affect distant regions, and even the entire world,” he added in his closing, in which has asked “learn the experience” of the coronavirus pandemic to “do the right thing”.

But some bad practices are repeated and, this Thursday, the public health authorities of Africa already warned that they were running out of vaccines and tests because the northern countries were hoarding supplies. In this continent, monkeypox is endemic in some countries, but recently it has begun to spread through countries without precedents such as Ghana, Morocco or South Africa.

“A repeat of what happened in the early days of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, when Africa watched on the sidelines as other countries seized limited supplies, should not be allowed to repeat itself. There are signs this is already happening,” lamented the regional director of the WHO, Matshidiso Moeti, and collects Reuters.


www.rtve.es

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Monkeypox triples in Europe: WHO calls for action





The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for action “urgent” in Europe Given the sharp increase in cases of monkey pox. The director of the European region, Hans Kluge, has warned that the cases have tripled in the last two weeks until exceeding 4,500 laboratory-confirmed infections, which places the continent as the epicenter of the outbreak still “expanding”.

The risk of monkeypox is currently “high” in Europe, according to the United Nations agency, which, however, recently ruled out declaring an “international public health emergency”. This decision could be reviewed “soon”, according to Kluge in a statement this Friday.

“There is simply no room for complacency, especially here in the European region, with a rapidly evolving outbreak and that every hour, every day and every week extends its reach to areas that were previously unaffected,” he stressed.

In his letter, the regional director of the WHO insists on the speed of expansion, but also on concentration: Europe accounts for nearly 90% of all confirmed cases by laboratory and reported globally since mid-May.

Spain reaches 1,200 cases

And among the thousands of cases of monkeypox detected in Europe, up to 1,200 correspond to Spain. The WHO reports are always later, due to the difficulty of collecting the data, but the most up-to-date Spanish figure was offered this Friday by the minister Carolina Darias to the media, after visiting the Marqués de Valdecilla Hospital, in Santander.

By communities, Madrid has confirmed about 850 infections to date and Catalonia adds 380while Andalusia exceeds 100 and the Canary Islands exceeds 50. Other regions maintain lower figures, such as the Valencian Community (23), Aragón (14), Galicia (9) or Castilla y León (4).

Vulnerable groups are concerned: children, immunosuppressed and pregnant women

Given this situation, the director general of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, is concerned that “sustained transmission” of monkeypox over time will impact children, immunosuppressed people and pregnant women, groups especially vulnerable to the disease. Although isolated, the first cases have already begun to be detected.

“A number of cases have been reported so far, but in countries with good surveillance. We are aware of two cases in the United Kingdom and we are following up with Spain and France“, specified Abdi Mahamud, from the health emergency coordination department, in a joint press conference with the director general. “When we talk about ‘children’, they are under 18 years old, some of them can be 17, 18 years old. At the moment, we do not have any serious cases, but it is an age group that really worries us.”

For now, there is no room for alarm. Most of the cases reported so far in Europe are in people between 21 and 40 years of age and 99% are men, as Hans Kluge has specified in his statement. Barely 10% of patients have been admitted to a hospital for treatment or isolation, and only one has been admitted to the ICU.

In Europe, no person has died by this outbreak of monkeypox, which almost always presents with a skin rash and, frequently, with symptoms such as fever, fatigue, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, chills, sore throat or headache.

“Stigma fuels epidemics”

Most of the reported cases of monkeypox in Europe correspond to men who have sex with men. In smaller numbers, cohabitants have also been identified, “heterosexual and non-sexual contacts, as well as between children,” continues Kluge’s statement, who fears that the “stigmatization” of the most affected group.

“Many may simply choose not to report to health authorities, fearful of the potential consequences. We know from the lessons we have learned in the fight against HIV that stigma further fuels outbreaks and epidemics”has warned.

However, the regional director of the WHO considers that not acting out of fear of stigma “can be just as damaging.” In fact, he has reported that his office is working with governments, the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control and civil entities, including the organizers of the “Pride and other massive summer festivals and events.”

Unlearned lessons from the pandemic: Africa runs out of supplies

Thus, Kluge has urged countries to “redouble” its efforts to reverse the expansive trend of monkeypox in Europeand launches three guidelines: expand surveillance (with diagnosis, tracking and sequencing), improve the communication of preventive measures and maintain investments in public health.

“Monkeypox has once again illustrated how endemic or emerging diseases in a few countries can rapidly expand into outbreaks that affect distant regions, and even the entire world,” he added in his closing, in which has asked “learn the experience” of the coronavirus pandemic to “do the right thing”.

But some bad practices are repeated and, this Thursday, the public health authorities of Africa already warned that they were running out of vaccines and tests because the northern countries were hoarding supplies. In this continent, monkeypox is endemic in some countries, but recently it has begun to spread through countries without precedents such as Ghana, Morocco or South Africa.

“A repeat of what happened in the early days of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, when Africa watched on the sidelines as other countries seized limited supplies, should not be allowed to repeat itself. There are signs this is already happening,” lamented the regional director of the WHO, Matshidiso Moeti, and collects Reuters.


www.rtve.es

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *