Miquel Montoro, 15-year-old ‘youtuber’: “I’ve thought more than once about quitting. At times you don’t enjoy life ”| Catalonia

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A simple Google search is enough to see how viral his name is already: Who is Miquel Montoro, the teenager from Mallorca famous for its’ host piles?; The Mallorcan youtuber who makes Broncano keep his promises; Montoro against ‘bullying’: “Why do they have to laugh at you for being different?”, are some of the headlines, among more than half a million results, that appear in the search engine.

There’s more: an already published autobiography (Uep! My adventures in the field); a role in a movieIncest, by Héctor Escandell), and, above all, almost a million followers and subscribers between Instagram and his YouTube channel. A figure six digits higher than the population of Sant Llorenç des Cardassar, the small Mallorcan town from where he hangs the videos about life in the countryside that have turned him into a child influence. He started with only 11 years old, now he is 15. He is in his teens.

In the last campaign in which he has participated in the ACB League: We act against ‘bullying’, Miquel Montoro (Mallorca, 15 years old) explains his experience of bullying that he suffered in Primary because of his physical appearance. “I believe that schools today could improve more in this regard,” he explains from his home to this newspaper with his mother Sandra, who also participates in some of the videos and coordinates their agenda, their events, and their social networks , together with a representative hired by the family.

“It’s really hard [el acoso escolar]. I suffered it for four years and there is a moment when you feel guilty. When it really is the other, the one who abuses, the one who is, ”says the adolescent about one of the problems that the ACB video emphasizes: when the person who suffers bullying has to leave school to escape from that environment, and those who abuse, stay. “That extreme did not happen to me, but I know of cases that did. It’s not fair, ”he adds.

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On harassment, Montoro also talks about the so-called haters (haters, often anonymous, on social media). “You don’t have to give importance to bad comments. There is always the typical … who does. In the whole world there will be someone who will not like your work. The simple fact of being famous hurts you so that later people criticize you. The one you have to listen to is the people who give you advice, ”he says. His mother intervenes to add: “Although he is one of the youtubers what less haters have. Maybe out of every 100 followers, there is only one ”. On Instagram alone, Montoro accumulates 580,000 followers.

“Over time, you learn,” explains the teenager about dealing with bad comments on the network and the price of criticism that, he explains, you have to pay when you become a public figure. Even when you are a child.

About fame in childhood, and rewinding the four intense years that he has lived since he jumped into television and internet virality at the age of 11 for a video on how to eat oranges (this alone accumulates a whopping 3 million visits), the youtuber He admits: “It’s hard to assimilate going down the street and getting stopped.” When asked if at any time he has wanted to stop being known, Montoro replies: “Yes. There comes a point where you say: ‘there are too many people here,’ he is sincere. In this sense, Montoro remembers a bad experience he had at a field fair in Zaragoza, in which he was invited. “People surrounded me, they wanted to see me. They climbed up the tractors to do it. One of them was drunk and wanted to get up to take a picture. I was overwhelmed, ”he recalls. So, I was only 13 years old. Montoro adds: “But then you think coldly and see the good things that you have experienced and that you could not have.”

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“And have you ever thought of stopping, of leaving everything?”

“Yes, more than once.” There comes a time when you say, ‘I’m not enjoying my life. I have thought about it many times. There are weeks when you go out of class … and you have to do an interview [con los medios]. And then you say: hey, I want to live too. After spending all morning studying and then in the afternoon having to be between cameras and such… no, no. And there you get to say: ‘I do not enjoy this’. We left it for a week, with nothing. And that’s it. You are doing.

The youtuber ensures that he does not pay attention to the number of views of his content and that he does not even know which is the last video that is uploaded. Many times he does not upload them. Among his publications, there is advertising for large companies such as Orange or Uber Eats.

However, despite having bad experiences like in the Zaragoza countryside fair, and admitting that at times he has wished not to be popular, the adolescent assures that his activity has brought him very good things: “Then you think about it cold, you leave advise for your family and help you see the good things to continue. I have been able to do unthinkable things and [he tenido] good experiences that would not have been possible ”, says the minor, who among his best experiences cites having been able to meet very wise and recognized people from the farming sector, his passion. With his videos, Montoro says that he seeks to “show how the local product is made and love it more”. “Today we don’t want it, if you see what’s behind it, people will do it more,” he adds.

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Montoro says he has made up his mind that it is youtuber one day it will end. “This I have assumed.” Although he does not directly feel identified with that term: “I am pagés [campesino]”, Sentence. He is in a hurry to finish the interview, one of his dogs just gave birth to a litter a few hours ago and he is excited, like any boy his age.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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