Met Office’s verdict on January forecast for UK to be hit by ’10 inch snowbomb’


Other forecasters have predicted Brits will feel the freeze in the New Year with more than 10 inches of snow expected to blast the UK by the middle of January

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UK Weather: Met Office 10 day weather forecast

Brits will need to wrap up warm after the new year as snow is set to blast some parts of the country, the Met Office claims.

But the UK weather agency stopped short of agreeing with other forecasters – who have warned of a looming “snowbomb” that will cover UK ground with 10 inches of snowfall.

By the middle of January more than 10 inches of snow will be seen on UK soil, according to forecaster WX Charts.

Sharing its new year weather charts, the agency showed a mass of snow ready to fall nationwide – with Newcastle and Northumberland hit hardest.

Scotland will also see a fair dusting, as will the Midlands, Wales. the Cotswolds, northwest and Cumbria.

As temperatures plunge below freezing, 11 inches may carpet the ground of Scotland as four centimetres are predicted for Manchester.

But the Met Office, looking from January 14 to January 28, has predicted: “Through the second half of January, a continuation of the rather changeable regime is expected with spells of wet and windy weather interspersed by drier, brighter periods.”

Other weather forecasters have predicted a looming “snowbomb” that will sweep the UK towards the end of January
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Image:

Lancs Live)

“Temperatures are overall expected to remain slightly above average as a result of mild spells and shorter-lived colder periods,” the forecasting agency adds.

“These shorter-lived colder periods may still allow for some snow but this will typically fall over hills in the north.”

The forecasting agency also warns to take care and exercise caution amid fog and frost.

The Met Office predicts a wet and windy January with the chance of snow for higher ground
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Image:

PA)

It comes after Brits were warned to wrap up warm in mid-January when 10 inches of snow are expected to fall after a possible record-high New Year’s Eve temperature.

Parts of the UK have had a carpet of snow this year with stormy weather in early December but it has been a warm month overall with temperatures in the mid-teens this week, the Met Office said.

But it is too early to think that winter is over as an Arctic blast is set to hit in January bringing freezing temperatures and snow.

Brits may get the chance to bask in the balmy air tonight after forecasters predicted the hottest New Year’s Eve on record
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Image:

REUTERS)

Maps from WXCharts show heavy snow is predicted for January 12 with up to 10 inches for the north of England including Newcastle and the North East, while five inches could land in Scotland.

The charts show 3 inches for Manchester while there is also a light covering of 1 inch for Wales and the Midlands.

There could be up to 10 inches of snow falling on January 12, according to WXCharts

Similar snowfalls are expected over the following days in mid-January while temperatures will start to drop early in the month with the mercury close to zero for England and as low as -5C in the Scottish Highlands.

Temperatures are expected to plummet after tonight’s warm weather

Before that though the UK could see the mildest New Year’s Eve on record, with sunshine in some areas.

Met Office meteorologist Rachel Ayers said there was a “good chance” of New Year’s Eve being the mildest ever.

“In the south of the UK the weather should be dry for tomorrow so people should be able to enjoy dry weather with some bright spells around,” she said.

“For New Year’s Day, another band of rain is pushing in from the west so the further east you are the drier your day will be with some bright spells.”

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www.mirror.co.uk

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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