Four-hundred-and-fifty deer and boar slaughtered in fenced enclosure by customers at Spanish hunt


Nearly 450 deer and wild boar have been slaughtered in a single day’s hunt in Spain as environmentalists slam the ‘orgy of blood and death’.

The mass killing took place on a commercial hunt on the Los Posteruelos private estate in Villaviciosa de Córdoba, near the Andalusian hills.

The 447 animals were penned in by fences so they could not escape the gunfire from the 70 hunters taking part.

Nearly 450 deer and wild boar have been slaughtered in a single day's hunt in Spain as environmentalists slam the 'orgy of blood and death'

Nearly 450 deer and wild boar have been slaughtered in a single day’s hunt in Spain as environmentalists slam the ‘orgy of blood and death’

The 447 animals were penned in by fences so they could not escape the gunfire from the 70 hunters taking part

The 447 animals were penned in by fences so they could not escape the gunfire from the 70 hunters taking part

Participants were each charged €1,000 for the shoot, which is legal under Spanish law

Participants were each charged €1,000 for the shoot, which is legal under Spanish law

Participants were each charged €1,000 for the shoot, which is legal under Spanish law.

But animal rights groups say the use of fencing is unethical and have condemned the hunt after images of the animals’ carcasses were shared online.

Each hunter killed around six or seven animals, a figure much higher than on an average day’s hunt, they say.

Manuel Gallardo, president of the Royal Spanish Hunting Federation, told El Mundo that large-scale hunting is ‘necessary due to the overabundance of species’.

But Joaquín Reina from Ecologists in Action blasted the shoot as an ‘orgy of blood and death’.

Animal rights groups say the use of fencing is unethical and have condemned the hunt after images of the animals' carcasses were shared online

Animal rights groups say the use of fencing is unethical and have condemned the hunt after images of the animals’ carcasses were shared online

Animal rights groups say the use of fencing is unethical and have condemned the hunt after images of the animals' carcasses were shared online

Animal rights groups say the use of fencing is unethical and have condemned the hunt after images of the animals’ carcasses were shared online

He said: ‘This is the daily life of most of the fenced estates in Sierra Morena, but also throughout Andalusia, with some 500,000 fenced hectares, Extremadura, Castilla-La Mancha and the Levante region.’

He said the massacre would be impossible on an open estate, saying: ‘The only defense is escape and this is absolutely diminished by a wire barrier.’

But Gallardo argued that the animals needed to be killed to ‘maintain the balance in the environment’.

He added that the ritualistic display of the animals’ bodies on the floor was also necessary for health regulations.

He said hunting is essential not only for conservation but also for the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of the region, saying it generates €6.5billion a year.

The Association of Law Professionals United for Animal Defense and the Environment of Córdoba has now demanded more information on the hunt to provide its legality.

Advocates say hunting is essential not only for conservation but also for the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of the region, saying it generates €6.5billion a year

The Association of Law Professionals United for Animal Defense and the Environment of Córdoba has now demanded more information on the hunt to provide its legality

The Association of Law Professionals United for Animal Defense and the Environment of Córdoba has now demanded more information on the hunt to provide its legality

In January 2019, a similar hunt on the same estate resulted in the deaths of 413 animals by 76 hunters.

The campaigners said they ‘will be raising their voice for the innocent being massacred’.

Princes William and Harry have previously taken part in boar hunts in Cordoba as a guest of the late Duke of Westminster.

The brothers flew out in 2014 to Finca La Garganta, one of the largest and most exclusive hunting estates in western Europe.

It is believed the animals on the shoot were not fenced in on the 37,000-hectare property which is teeming with wildlife including wild boar and stag.

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Wild boar hunting in popular in Spain and can be hunted year-round without restrictions.

The animal is also considered a pest in many Spanish cities, with regular reports of them attacking and biting locals.

One unfortunate recent victim was the popstar Shakira after two wild boar snatched her handbag in a Barcelona park.

Boar numbers have reportedly doubled in recent years, as pro-hunting groups say the practice keeps population levels stable.

Hunting has a long tradition in Spain, with ‘la monteria’ dating back to the Middle Ages in the Iberian Peninsula.

Early records show King Alfonso XI took part in hunts in the early 14th century with hounds and beaters.

Spain has previously been criticized for mass greyhound deaths at the end of the hunting season, in which the dogs were thrown down wells, tied to rail tracks or dumped by busy roads.

Selfish pet owners discard the working dogs, known as galgos, so they do not have to pay for food to keep them alive after the season ends.

Animal welfare campaigners estimate that Spain has 200,000 registered galgueros, who own up to ten dogs each, and that up to 50,000 greyhounds are abandoned at the end of each season.

Charities struggle to cope with the influx of abandoned dogs, many of whom are either left to fend for themselves or taken to kill shelters.

Others are left to die down wells, with cruel owners blocking up the entrance with wood so there is no chance of escape.

Last month, a hunter became the hunted when a wild boar fatally bit an Italian man who had shot at it for sport.

Giulio Burattini, 36, bled to death in front of his father while the pair were out hunting near the Pigelleto di Piancastagnaio nature reserve in Italy’s Tuscany region.

Giulio had landed a shot on the wild beast, which collapsed to the ground as the hunter went over the check on his prey, according to local media.

But to the Italian’s surprise, the boar shot to his feet and bit the top of his right leg as he approached, severing his femoral artery and killing him.

His last desperate message was reportedly a warning cry to his friends through his walkie-talkie: ‘Help, help I’m dying’.

Forest rescue teams and the emergency services rushed to try and revive the 36-year-old, but he had lost too much blood and died in front of his veterinary father who would require treatment for shock.

The Grosseto public prosecutor office declined to investigate the case, citing the accident as being caused by a wild animal and there being no criminal implications involved in Mr Burattini’s death.

Burattini, who came from Castell’Azzara, leaves behind a wife and a seven-year-old daughter.

In another boar-related hunting accident, a hiker was shot to death after he was mistaken for the animal in the south of France.

Jean-Louis Blanc, 59, was out walking close to the village of Taulignan, in the Drome department, when he was hit in the groin by a bullet in 2017.

The hunter, known only as Luc C, 62, was given a two-year suspended sentence last year for the accidental shooting.


www.dailymail.co.uk

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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