Elizabeth line map: London Crossrail route and full list of stops

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Everything you need to know about London’s new Elizabeth line, also known as Crossrail, including a full list of stops and when services will start after years of delays

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - 2022/04/08: New signs seen outside the newly-built Farringdon Elizabeth Line station.  The new London Underground line is expected to open before summer 2022. (Photo by Vuk Valcic/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Crossrail’s Elizabeth line is set to open after years of delays, here’s all the stops that the new service will go to

Transport for London (TFL) has finally confirmed an opening date for the new Elizabeth line after the Crossrail route has undergone years of delays.

TFL has announced that the line will open on 24 May 2022.

Crossrail is a capacity enhancement rail project designed to create a rail link that connects east and west London.

The new railway, which is estimated to cost £18.7 billion, will feature trains nearly twice as long as a tube train that can carry 1,500 passengers.

The opening of the Elizabeth line comes after nearly four years of delays due to the Covid-19 pandemic, planning issues and overspending.

But as the route is finally set to open, here’s everything you need to know.

What is the Elizabeth line?







The Elizabeth line will connect East and West London
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Image:

NEIL HALL/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

The Elizabeth line is a new railway for London and the South East that the Crossrail project is delivering.

Although only one line, the Elizabeth line splits off in two directions at either end, running out to Reading and Heathrow in the west (joining at Hayes and Harlington), and Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east (which will eventually join at Whitechapel) .

In total, the line will stretch over 100km, including 42km of new tunnels.

The line will run through central London, but it will also connect popular commuter towns to the east and west of London as it runs through Maidenhead, Slough, Ilford and Brentwood.

What stops are on the Elizabeth line?







With 41 stops the line is expected to be used by 200 million people a year
(

Image:

Alamy Live News.)

Once fully operational, the Elizabeth line will stop at a total of 41 accessible stations and 10 of these are brand new stations.

Crossrail estimates that the line will serve around 200 million people every year.

The 41 stops include:

  • Reading
  • Twyford
  • maidenhead
  • taplow
  • Burnham
  • slough
  • Langley
  • iver
  • West Drayton
  • Hayes & Harlington
  • southall
  • Hanwell
  • West Ealing
  • Ealing Broadway
  • Acton Main Line
  • Paddington
  • Bond Street
  • Tottenham Court Road
  • Farringdon
  • liverpool street
  • whitechapel
  • Stratford
  • Maryland
  • Forest Gate
  • Manor Park
  • Ilford
  • Seven Kings
  • Goodmayes
  • Chadwell Heath
  • Romford
  • Gidea Park
  • Harold Wood
  • Brentwood
  • Shenfield
  • canary wharf
  • custom-house
  • Woolwich
  • Abbey Wood
  • Heathrow Airport Terminals 2 & 3
  • Heathrow AirportTerminal 4
  • Heathrow AirportTerminal 5






Here is the full map so you can see where the Elizabeth line will stop
(

Image:

TFL)

When will the Elizabeth line open?

The new line is set to open on Tuesday May 24, but the line won’t be fully operational then.

When it opens, the service will run Monday to Saturday from 6.30am to 11pm. There will be 12 trains an hour, that’s a train every five minutes, between Paddington and Abbey Wood.







The new line will open in time for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee
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Image:

GettyImages)

For now, the line will not run on Sundays but this is expected to change by autumn.

There will, however, be a special service in operation between 8am and 10pm on Sunday 5 June in celebration of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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