Doomsday Clock reveals that Earth is closer than ever to the apocalypse

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Symbolizing the threat of a global apocalypse, the “Doomsday Clock” will remain at 100 seconds to midnight, the closest it has ever been.

The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists (BAS), which controls the clock, decided to keep the minute hand in its most dangerous position since the concept began in 1947 due to ongoing unrest around the world.

The watch has been presented for the 75th time.
The watch has been presented for the 75th time.

With the threat of war between Russia and Ukraine, the ongoing climate crisis and the coronavirus pandemic, the panel warned of a “mixed threat environment” and called 2022 a “dangerous moment” in our history.

They also added that the world was “no safer” than it was last year during a press conference in Washington DC, the Mirror reports.

Rachel Bronson, president and CEO of BAS, said the clock “is floating dangerously” with the work needed to turn back the hands of the clock.

She added: “Today the members of the Science and Safety Board find that the world is no safer than it was last year at this time and have therefore decided to set the Doomsday Clock once again to 100 seconds. for midnight.”

The clock is designed to act as a symbolic measure of the “world’s vulnerability to catastrophe”.

Keeping last year’s setting means that the watch keepers believe that the threat of global apocalypse has not cooled in the last 12 months.

The clock was previously set at two minutes to midnight in 2018, but was moved to 100 seconds to midnight following the covid pandemic in 2020.
The clock was previously set at two minutes to midnight in 2018, but was moved to 100 seconds to midnight following the covid pandemic in 2020.

President Bronson added, “The Doomsday Clock continues to tick dangerously, reminding us how much work is needed to ensure a safer and healthier planet. We must continue to turn the hands of the clock away from midnight.”

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Its minute hand was originally set at seven minutes to midnight, the point of a hypothetical world disaster.

In 2020, it was set to 100 seconds to midnight, the closest we’ve come to total destruction, and it stayed there last year.

Before that, it was pegged at the two-minute mark in 2018 due to concerns about fake news and information warfare.

It was previously set at the two-minute point in 1953 when the US and Soviet Union tested thermonuclear weapons.

The furthest he’s been from midnight was 17 minutes at the end of the Cold War,

“For 75 years, the Doomsday Clock has acted as a metaphor for how close humanity is to self-annihilation,” reads the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists website.

“Since 1947, it has also served as a call to action to reverse hands, which have moved back before.”

The countdown was set in 1947 by scientists working on the Manhattan Project, which helped design and build the first atomic bomb.

It was intended to warn of the threat of nuclear armageddon, but now takes into account other emerging threats, such as climate challenges and advances in biotechnology and artificial intelligence.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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