Covid infections so severe Government website needs a new colour for interactive map

[ad_1]

As Omicron tears through the country, a new colour is being added to the Government’s interactive Covid map, showing hotspots with more than 1,600 cases per 100,000 people

Covid cases are at an all-time high in the UK as Omicron sweeps across the country
Covid cases are at an all-time high in the UK as Omicron sweeps across the country

Omicron cases are spreading so fast in the UK that the Government’s website has introduced a new Covid map colour to show spiralling infections.

The change will come into force on December 21, adding a new colour to the gov.uk interactive map which shows seven-day coronavirus infection rates.

It comes as cases hit an all-time high on December 17, when 93,045 infections were recorded, sparking calls for new Covid restrictions.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) has even warned that coronavirus deaths could rise to up to 6,000 a day if No. 10 fails to act.

The group called for a month-long lockdown to bring Omicron under control, however, Boris Johnson has ruled out immediately implementing new restrictions.

SAGE scientist Professor Stephen Reicher previously urged the Government to “act now” and said that restrictions after Christmas would “probably” be too late.

The Government’s own interactive map for infection rates is now introducing a new colour for areas facing more than 1,600 cases per 100,000 people.

Areas battling the highest Covid infection rates are currently painted in burgundy on the Government’s interactive map
(

Image:

coronavirus.data.gov.uk)

The areas hardest hit by coronavirus are currently painted burgundy on the map – meaning they have more than 800 cases per 100,000 population.

The new bracket is being introduced as infections spike in south-east England and London, where hospitalisations are also rising.

It comes after Mayor Sadiq Khan announced a ‘major incident’ in London last week as it emerged the country’s eight worst Covid hotspots were in the capital.

Despite this, Mr Johnson is still not ordering new restrictions, although he was said to be considering a possible lockdown along with other options.

Following a Cabinet meeting on Monday, the PM said: “We are looking at all kinds of things to keep Omicron under control and we will rule nothing out.

London and the south-east are the country’s worst Covid hotspots
(

Image:

coronavirus.data.gov.uk)

“But at the moment what I think we want people to focus on is exercising caution so ventilation, masks in the appropriate places, all the usual stuff about washing hands, but remember how contagious Omicron really is.

“I think what you’re seeing already is the British public understanding that and you can see in people’s patterns of behaviour since we went to Plan B that they are changing the way they go about their lives, they are changing some of the assumptions they make about the things that they want to do.”

He said scientists were looking at the data “hour by hour”.

A message on the gov.uk website has announced that a new colour is being added to the interactive Covid map

Get all the latest news sent to your inbox. Sign up for the free Mirror newsletter

“Unfortunately I must say to people that we will have to reserve the possibility of taking further action to protect the public, to protect public health, to protect our NHS,” he said.

The Mirror previously reported on how the Government was said to be considering a ban on indoor household mixing after Christmas in a bid to control the spread of the new strain.

It comes after a damning new picture emerged of Mr Johnson enjoying wine and cheese with his wife and more than a dozen staff members in the Downing Street garden.

The image was taken in May 2020 when the country was under lockdown and social mixing between households was limited to two people outdoors.

Read More

Read More



[ad_2]
www.mirror.co.uk

See also  "I've saved more than £400 shopping in second hand stores this year"

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.