Coronavirus infection rates continue to rise in nine boroughs across Greater Manchester



Coronavirus infection rates are continuing to rise in nine boroughs of Greater Manchester, according to the latest data.

The most recent figures from the UK Health Security Agency show that weekly rates have only failed in Bury. Trafford continues to have the highest transmission rate across the region. Oldham has the lowest.

Across Greater Manchester as a whole, the infection rate now stands at 621.5 cases per 100,000 population. This is lower than the national average of 858 per 100,000.

READMORE: Can you catch Covid twice? Professor explains how quickly you could be re-infected

17,624 people tested positive for coronavirus across the region in the week ending on March 27. The weekly total has increased by 2010 cases compared to the previous week, which means the infection rate was up 13 per cent in the last week.

Hospital admissions

In the week ending on March 27, a total of 726 patients were admitted to Greater Manchester NHS hospitals with Covid-19. That is 159 more than the week before, a rise of 28 per cent. On Tuesday March 29, there were 15 Mechanical Ventilation (MV) beds occupied by Covid patients in Greater Manchester NHS hospitals. That is one more than a week earlier.

This is the most recent available data for hospital admissions, the figures for NHS trusts are not updated daily.

deaths

In the week ending March 27, a total of 29 people died within 28 days of a positive Covid test across Greater Manchester, which is six more than the week before. Since the start of the pandemic, there have been a total of 953,200 confirmed coronavirus cases in Greater Manchester. There has been a total of 8,876 deaths.

Cases reported in each of the ten boroughs

In Wigan, the latest infection rate is 657.4 per 100,000 and the number of cases has gone up by 30 per cent. A total of 2174 people tested positive over the seven days ending on March 27, which is 507 more than the week before.

In Bolton, the number of cases is up by 30 per cent compared to the previous week – leaving the infection rate at 513.1. There were 1479 positive Covid-19 tests, which was 344 more than the previous week.

The trend is up in Tameside, where there were 1464 positive tests, which is 113 more than the previous week. That is up by eight per cent. The latest infection rate in Tameside is 644.6.

Oldham, which has the lowest infection rate in the region, recorded 1024 positive Covid-19 tests in the week ending March 27, which is 68 more than the previous week. The coronavirus infection rate in Oldham is now 430.9 which is up by seven per cent week-on-week.

Bury saw a total of 1,109 cases, which is eight fewer than the previous week. That is a fall of one per cent. The most recent coronavirus infection rate is now 581.5.

There were 2347 positive tests over the last week in Stockport, which is 95 more than in the previous week. The week-on-week trend in Stockport is up by four per cent and the latest infection rate is 797.8.

Salford recorded 1725 coronavirus cases, which is 298 more than in the previous seven days. The latest infection rate in Salford is 656.6 and that is up 21 per cent week-on-week.

Rochdale is an area where the trend is up. The latest infection rate here is 491.4. There were 1099 cases recorded, which is 210 more than the previous week – a rise of 24 per cent.

In Trafford, there were 1972 positive Covid-19 tests in the week ending March 27, which is 102 more than the previous week. The infection rate is down slightly compared with the previous day but the week-on-week trend is up by five per cent.

There was a rise of ten per cent in cases in Manchester, and the infection rate is now 581.4. The borough recorded 3,231 positive Covid-19 tests over the seven-day period, and that is 281 more than the previous week.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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