Beaming Kate Middleton gets stuck in as she plays with toddlers during cooking workshop


Kate joined families at the activity session to hear about challenges they face – the first time she’s been pictured out after the bombshell announcement Camilla would be Queen

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Kate Middleton visits a parental support group

Kate Middleton took part in a cooking workshop with parents and toddlers during a visit to a playgroup in South London today.

The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured beaming as she makes fruit kebabs with toddlers and met both mothers and youngsters to hear about challenges they face on Tuesday, February 8.

It’s the first time Kate has been pictured out after the Queen made her extraordinary statement on Saturday that Camilla can take the title of Queen.

For years insiders were sure Camilla would take the title Princess Consort when Prince Charles becomes King but in a statement at 10pm on Saturday (February 5) the Palace announced the monarch’s wish that Camilla be known as Queen Consort.

Kate joined families at the activity and wellbeing session run by PACT (Parents and Communities Together) at MumSpace in Southwark today.

Kate, a champion of research into early childhood, heard about the challenges faced as she joined in with a cooking workshop during the visit. She helped young children chop and eat fruit to the soundtrack of a catchy song about bananas.

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Kate took part in a cooking workshop with parents and toddlers today
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She spoke to parents about the importance of a “holistic” system to ensure isolated new mothers and their babies do not “fall through the cracks”.

Hearing how PACT runs “Parent University” courses for expectant parents and those with newborn babies, the duchess heard how mothers were learning about social and emotional development as well as the basics about labor and feeding.

Josephine Namusisi-Riley, who leads PACT in Southwark, and health visitor Simonette Guerra described how the course dealt with the importance of the early years, including brain and language development and play.

“As a new mum I would have liked that,” the Duchess said. “I think I would have learned a lot. The importance of play.”

She added: “What’s so fantastic is seeing the amazing work that’s going on here. That support you’re providing is amazing. The science backs it up.”

Kate helped two-year-old Jonathan – who was wearing a smart shirt and celebrating his birthday – chop up his banana.

His grandmother Grace told her that the sessions featured “a lot of children and many, many toys”.

“Has it helped your relationship with him?” Kate asked, breaking off to say “Good job” to the youngster who was eating nicely.

The Duchess was pictured beaming at the event in South London
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Going to shake the hand of one mother, she laughed: “Sorry, now I’ve got a sticky hand,” before pulling a face of amazement at Zoe, a nearby one-year-old, who was busy eating strawberries.

“I can see why everyone likes it here,” Kate added.

Kate watched children climbing up a frame to go down a slide, and accepted a ‘cup of tea’, full of kinetic sand, from a boy called George – the same name as her eldest.

Playing along, she took her mask off for a pretend sip before saying thank you and passing it back to him.

The duchess spent time with Laura Barber, mother of two-year-old Rebecca, who talked about mental health and the challenges of parenting in isolation.

Ms Barber said: “She said if she had had something like this, she would have appreciated it too.”

MumSpace playgroups are free weekly sessions organized by PACT to allow mothers to share the ups and downs of motherhood.

Kate, has set up the Royal Foundation Center for Early Childhood, is said to focus much of her charity work on early childhood and how it affects outcomes in later life.

The Duchess helped children make fruit kebabs as part of the cooking workshop
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Kate will also meet a health visitor who regularly provides the group with advice and signposting to other services, before joining a cooking workshop with parents and children.

Through her work over the past decade The Duchess of Cambridge is understood to have seen first-hand how some of today’s hardest social challenges have their roots in the earliest years of a person’s life.

The Duchess says she is committed to raising awareness of the importance of early childhood experiences and of collaborative action to improve outcomes across society.

The Duchess is committed to raising awareness of the importance of early childhood experiences
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PACT works to combat isolation, support parental mental health and engage hard-to-reach communities in accessing health and social services.

MumSpace playgroups are free weekly sessions organized by PACT to allow mothers to share the ups and downs of motherhood.

It comes after news the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge could take over Windsor Castle when Prince Charles becomes King.

The Cambridges’ London base is currently Kensington Palace while they also have Anmer Hall on the Sandringham estate in Norfolk, given to them by the Queen.

According to the Daily Mail when Charles becomes King, he intends to move into Buckingham Palace and it will effectively be his “flat above the shop”.

And when this happens, sources say Prince William and Kate will ‘ultimately inherit Windsor Castle’ – but keep their domestic and work base at Kensington Palace in London.

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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