Policeman ‘had sexual relationship with alleged rape victim he met through work’



A serving police officer had a secret sexual relationship with an alleged rape victim, a court has heard.

PC Simon Rose kept the relationship quiet and when, by coincidence, a search warrant was later issued for the woman’s home he tried to dissuade his colleagues from searching for evidence.

Once the Independent Office for Police Conduct became involved in the case in January 2020 the woman told of their pair’s relationship.

A jury at Liverpool Crown Court heard how their relationship became sexual a few months after their first meeting and she said she had sex with the Greater Manchester Police officer on three or four occasions.

She also said they exchanged sexual messages, spoke about their sexual fantasies and she sent him explicit photographs of herself.

Mr Rose, 48, denies misconduct in a public office and also attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Vanessa Thomson, prosecuting, told the jury that Mr Rose, of Burnside, Parbold, joined the force in 2007.


PC Simon Rose outside Liverpool Crown Court
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Image:

Liverpool Echo)

He was attached to the Salford division and was a “highly respected, outgoing police officer”.

Miss Thomson said: “It is alleged by the Crown, that through his role as a police constable he embarked upon a relationship with a vulnerable female in 2012 which he failed to notify to his management team.

“The relationship endured for a number of years and was hidden from his colleagues until October 2019 when her name came under the spotlight in respect of a lawful execution of a search warrant at her home.”

Miss Thomson explained that his role as a specially trained officer involved in dealing with rape and sexual assault allegations.

Mr Rose met the woman in May 2012.

In 2018 to 2019 he changed roles and was based at Swinton police station, involved with a team researching intelligence and then obtaining and executing search warrants “to complete searches for drugs, stolen property, firearms and wanted persons”.

In September 2019, the team were involved in various “disruption tactics” against known individuals from Salford.

This included executing a search warrant at a house in Salford which had a connection to a man allegedly involved in a serious aggravated burglary.

Miss Thomson said that it was also the home of the woman that Mr Rose had the relationship with, but added it was not suggested she was involved in any of the criminality being investigated.

When a colleague told Mr Rose about the address he said it must be incorrect and he knew her as she had previously been involved in a relationship with a police community support officer.

Over three days, Mr Rose spoke to his colleague again about the warrant, asking him to “be decent with her” and saying he had helped her with her own application to become a PCSO.

The officer said he had kept in contact with her and knew she had just flown out of the country.

He told another colleague that he was having problems at home and “his head was not in the right place”.

This followed a general decline in his mood which had been noted by his colleague over the previous two weeks.

On October 3, he went with the two colleagues to execute the search warrant and en route he told PC Daniel Caldcleugh that he actually knew the woman from when she had been the victim of criminal damage and assisted with her PCSO role, adding he “remained on friendly terms with her”.

He said that the friendship could have been regarded as “flirty but it was never sexual”.

Mr Rose admitted he had even spoken to her that morning.

As they got nearer he said he was worried that something would be recovered from her home which would get him sacked, said Miss Thomson.

“The closer they got to the address the more anxious Simon Rose became, culminating in him asking PC Caldcleugh to ‘avoid looking to find evidence at the address and to overlook any evidence that might be found’.”

He also told his colleagues to be specific in the way in which they spoke to people at the address and PC Caldcleugh “became alarmed by the direction of the conversation”.

Miss Thomson added: “He was unhappy with what he had been told and what he had been asked to do by a colleague who was by now displaying erratic behaviour.”

Mr Rose was told to stay away from the house and it was decided to abandon the search as there were now only two officers available to execute the warrant.

Back in the van, Mr Rose asked them to keep the revelations between the three of them.

PC Caldcleugh later suggested that Mr Rose raise the matter with his superiors but he refused and pleaded with him not to bring it up and said he was feeling suicidal.

Despite this, the officer told his sergeant.

The case is held at Liverpool Crown Court
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Image:

Liverpool Echo)

Later that night, Mr Rose contacted the sergeant himself and repeated his claims about the criminal damage report and assisting with with her PSCO application for which he had given her his mobile number.

He denied it was a sexual relationship and said they had not been in contact “for ages”.

The sergeant said the matter was closed until he spoke to their inspector but when PC Caldcleugh told him that Mr Rose had suggested they did not need to force entry and they could ignore that they might find, the matter was referred to an inspector.

When Mr Rose spoke to the inspector he made the same claims about his relationship with the woman and denied asking his colleagues “to look the other way” if they found anything during the search, the court heard.

However, he later changed his account and said he met her when she made a complaint about rape and had been in recent communication with her.

The inspector stopped the meeting and reported the matter to the professional standards branch despite Mr Rose “begging” him not to do so.

Miss Thomson told the jury that during the interview with the IOPC the woman said that she had “strong feelings for Mr Rose a number of years ago and that he had discussed them being together even though he had a partner”.

When she embarked on a new relationship, her relationship with Mr Rose turned into a close friendship.

In his interviews with the IOPC, he denied having had a sexual relationship with the woman and said he did not regard their relationship as close friends.

He denied being at her address while off duty but accepted she had been to his home after he had been involved in a serious crash.

Mr Rose accepted he had handled the warrant badly and said he had “buried his head in the sand” regarding the link between the woman and the property.

He denied trying to influence his colleagues to ignore evidence and claims his words had been misinterpreted.

He denies misconduct in a public office and also attempting to pervert the course of justice

The case continues.




www.mirror.co.uk

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George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

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