10 major changes made to Highway Code from today which most drivers won’t know

[ad_1]

The Highway Code contains advice and rules for people on Britain’s roads. The latest changes are advisory, so non-compliance will not result in a fine. A hierarchy of road users is also being introduced

Cyclists are advised to ride in the center of lanes on quieter roads
Cyclists are advised to ride in the center of lanes on quieter roads

A major revamp of the Highway Code to boost protection for cyclists and pedestrians comes into force today amid concern millions of drivers are unaware of the changes.

The new guidance means traffic should give way when pedestrians are crossing or waiting to cross at junctions.

Cyclists are advised to ride in the center of lanes on quieter roads, in slower-moving traffic, and when approaching junctions, to make themselves as visible as possible.

A hierarchy of road users is also being introduced, meaning drivers will have more responsibility to watch out for people cycling, walking, or riding a horse, and cyclists will have more responsibility to be aware of pedestrians.

Turning traffic should now give way when pedestrians are crossing or waiting to cross at junctions.

The Highway Code will include new priorities for pedestrians
(

Image:

Press Association Images)

And motorists will be encouraged to adopt the so-called ‘Dutch Reach’, opening the door next to them with the opposite hand so they look over their shoulder, meaning they’re more likely to spot and less likely to injure passing cyclists and pedestrians .

The Highway Code contains advice and rules for people on Britain’s roads. Nine sections have been updated, with 50 rules added or amended.

The changes are advisory, so non-compliance will not result in a fine.

AA president Edmund King expressed concern at the potential impact of the guidance to give way to pedestrians at junctions.

I have suggested that drivers are “likely to get hit by another vehicle from behind” if they stop on dual carriageways or fast-flowing A roads to let someone cross.

He also warned that pedestrians could be endangered if one vehicle gives way but another traveling in the opposite direction fails to stop.

There are also new rules at junctions
(

Image:

Press Association Images)

“Drivers will have to make their own judgments on what they should do in the scenarios they find themselves in,” Mr King said.

“However, if the judgments of the driver and the pedestrian are at odds on a very busy road, this could lead to problems.”

An AA survey of more than 13,700 drivers carried out earlier this month indicated that 33% were unaware of the changes.

A communications drive will be launched by the Department for Transport’s road safety offshoot Think! in mid-February, with further activity later in the summer.

Roads minister Baroness Vere said this week that the updated Highway Code will make Britain’s roads safer and encourage people to “respect and consider the needs of those around them”.

Charity Cycling UK said the changes must be “communicated with simple, accurate and memorable messaging”.

10 of the biggest changes

1. Hierarchy of road users

A new hierarchy means people in charge of vehicles that can cause the most harm in the event of a collision and have the greatest responsibility to look out for other road users.

2. Walking, cycling or riding in shared spaces

Cyclists should not overtake people walking or riding a horse in shared spaces closely or at high speed, while pedestrians should take care not to obstruct paths.

3.Positioning of cyclists

Cyclists should make themselves as visible as possible by riding in the center of lanes on quiet roads, in slower-moving traffic and at the approach to junctions.

4. Pedestrians crossing at junctions

Turning traffic should give way when people are crossing or waiting to cross at junctions. Traffic must give way to people on zebra crossings.

5. Overtaking cyclists

Drivers traveling at speeds of up to 30mph should leave at least 1.5 meters when overtaking cyclists.

They should give more space when overtaking at higher speeds.

6.Open car doors

Car occupants should open doors using their hand on the opposite side to the door, making them turn their head to look over their shoulder.

This technique, known as the Dutch Reach, reduces the chances of doors being opened into the path of cyclists and motorcyclists.

7. Overtaking cyclists at junctions

When cyclists are going straight ahead at a junction, they have priority over traffic waiting to turn into or out of a side road, unless road signs or markings indicate otherwise.

8.Cycling in groups

People cycling can ride two abreast but should be considerate of the needs of other road users when in groups.

9. Roundabouts

Drivers should take extra care when entering roundabouts to make sure they do not cut across cyclists.

10. Electric vehicle charging

Electric car owners using a public chargepoint should park near the device and avoid creating a trip hazard from trailing cables.

Read More

Read More



[ad_2]
www.mirror.co.uk

See also  Noma Dumezweni to return to London stage in A Doll's House, Part 2

Related Posts

George Holan

George Holan is chief editor at Plainsmen Post and has articles published in many notable publications in the last decade.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.